Echeveria 'Moondust'


Scientific Name

Echeveria 'Moondust'

Scientific Classification

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Sedoideae
Tribe: Sedeae
Subtribe: Sedinae
Genus: Echeveria

Description

Echeveria 'Moondust' is a slow-growing hybrid of Echeveria laui and Echeveria lilacina. It grows up to 6 inches (15 cm) across and offsets to form a nice, tight colony. The leaves are pale and glaucous, covered with a fine waxy bloom that rubs off when touched.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zone 9b to 11b: from 25 °F (−3.9 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

Most of the common Echeveria species are not complicated succulents to grow, provided you follow a few basic rules. First, be careful never to let water sit in the rosette as it can cause rot or fungal diseases that will kill the plant. Additionally, remove dead leaves from the bottom of the plant as it grows. These dead leaves provide a haven for pests, and Echeveria are susceptible to mealy bugs. As with all succulents, careful watering habits and plenty of light will help ensure success.

Repot as needed, preferably during the warm season. To repot a succulent, make sure the soil is dry before repotting, then gently remove the pot. Knock away the old soil from the roots, making sure to remove any rotted or dead roots in the process. Treat any cuts with a fungicide. Place the plant in its new pot and backfill with potting soil, spreading the roots out as you repot. Leave the plant dry for a week or so, then begin to water lightly to reduce the risk of root rot.

Most Echeveria can be easily propagated from leaf cuttings, although a few are better from seeds or stem cuttings. To propagate a leaf cutting, place the individual leaf in a succulent or cacti mix and cover the dish until the new plant sprouts… – See more at: How to Grow and Care for Echeveria

Origin

It is a Kelly Griffin hybrid between Echeveria laui and Echeveria lilacina.

Links

  • Back to genus Echeveria
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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Echeveria ‘Moondust’ – Succulent plants

Echeveria ‘Moondust’ is an attractive hybrid of Echeveria laui and Echeveria lilacina. It grows up to 15 cm across and offsets to form a nice, tight colony. The leaves are pale and glaucous, covered with a fine waxy bloom that rubs off when touched.

Scientific Classification:

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Sedoideae
Tribe: Sedeae
Subtribe: Sedinae
Genus: Echeveria

Scientific Name: Echeveria ‘Moondust’

How to grow and maintain Echeveria ‘Moondust’:

Light:
It thrives best in full sun to light shade. In indoor an east or west-facing window where they receive four to six hours of sunlight is ideal.

Soil:
It grows well in a well-drained succulent mix, with an ideal pH around 6.0 (slightly acidic) or an equal part sharp sand with all-purpose potting mix.

Water:
Water Echeveria plant regularly during the summer and spring. keep the soil evenly moist but not soggy. You can allow the topsoil to become slightly dry between each watering. Reduce water in the winter.

Temperature:
It prefers an average summer temperature of 65ºF / 18ºC – 70ºF / 21ºC. In winter, cool to 50ºF / 10ºC.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize with a controlled-release fertilizer at the beginning of the season or weekly with a weak liquid solution. Use a balanced 20-20-20 fertilizer at 1/4 strength on mature plants, and a fertilizer with less nitrogen on young plants.

Re-potting:
Re-pot as needed, preferably during the warm season. To re-pot, a succulent, make sure the soil is dry before re-potting, then gently remove the pot. Knock away the old soil from the roots, making sure to remove any rotted or dead roots in the process. Treat any cuts with a fungicide. Place the plant in its new pot and backfill with potting soil, spreading the roots out as you re-pot. Leave the plant dry for a week or so, then begin to water lightly to reduce the risk of root rot.

Propagation:
It can be easily propagated by seeds, offsets or leaf cuttings in spring. To propagate a leaf cutting, place the individual leaf in a succulent or cacti mix and cover the dish until the new plant sprouts.

Pests and Diseases:

It has no serious pest or disease problems. Mealybugs can be a problem, and if dead leaves are not expelled from the plant, it can attract other insect pests or have problems with fungus.


Echeveria gibbiflora hybrids: A short history

Aaron Ryan

Recent Articles

HISTORY OF ECHEVERIA GIBBIFLORA HYBRIDS

Echeveria gibbiflora is the largest of all echeveria species, and one of the parent plants of the majority of the large, cabbage-head echeveria hybrids we’ve come to know so well. There are so many of these hybrids in cultivation today that it is difficult to properly identify them all or trace back their origins to their original hybridizers (many are likely incidental crosses). These hybrids vary greatly in size, color, shape, and form depending on their parentage. Echeveria gibbiflora is itself a highly variable species, making the possibilities for new hybrids endless.

The earliest known E. gibbiflora hybrid is the common garden plant Echeveria ‘Imbricata’, a cross of E. secunda, a low-growing blue species that offsets prolifically (hence its common name, “Hens and Chicks”). One of the most familiar succulents to gardeners, E. ‘Imbricata’ was hybridized by Frenchman M. Deleuil in the late 19 th century. Because it became so common, nurseries often overlooked growing E. ‘Imbricata’, and there is currently a huge demand for this “retro” hybrid. Beloved by landscapers for its durability, E. ‘Imbricata’ is one of the more cold-hardy of the E. gibbiflora crosses.

Another early E. gibbiflora hybrid is the beautiful Echeveria ‘Perle von Nurnberg’, a hybrid of E. gibbiflora ‘Metallica’ (a particularly purple form of the species) and Echeveria elegans. Developed in Germany during the 1930s by collector R. Graessner, E. ‘Perle von Nurnberg’ is still regarded as one of the most beautiful of all echeveria hybrids and has become ubiquitous in the nursery trade, even finding its way into grocery stores and wedding bouquets. A bit more delicate than its cousin, E. ‘Imbricata’, E. ‘Perle von Nurnberg’ performs best in pots where it can be moved in case of frost or extreme heat.

Beginning around the middle of the 20 th Century, growers, collectors, and horticulturalists began churning out a great many new E. gibbiflora hybrids. The results were dramatic and diverse: bumps, curls and every color imaginable, sometimes all on a single plant (Have a look at Echeveria ‘Mauna Loa’). Dick Wright, Frank Reinelt and Harry Butterfield were all California-based echeveria enthusiasts and instrumental in producing some of the most beautiful E. gibbiflora hybrids that we see today. Echeveria hybridizing continues in our modern times, and it’s unlikely to stop any time soon due to the beauty and diversity of the genus.

At Succulent Gardens, Echeveria gibbiflora hybrids are amongst our favorites at the nursery. A large section of one of our greenhouses hosts a collection of numerous crosses, some intentional, some incidental. The result is a beautiful rainbow of brilliant color that we never cease to enjoy. Our hybrid collection is not limited to E. gibbiflora crosses, however. We also have many E. gigantea and E. subrigida hybrids up in the mix as well.


Watch the video: Heart Shape Laui, Moondust, Turtles and MORE. VLOG #42 Succulents u0026 Coffee w. Liz


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