Silver Pig's Ears


Succulentopedia

Cotyledon orbiculata (Pig's Ear)

Cotyledon orbiculata (Pig's Ear) is a succulent shrub with erect to decumbent stems and leaves hugely variable in color, shape, and…


Stachys, Lamb's Ear 'Silver Carpet'

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 °C (-30 °F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 °C (-25 °F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 °C (-20 °F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 °C (-15 °F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 °C (-10 °F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 °C (-5 °F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 °C (0 °F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 °C (5 °F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 °C (10 °F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)

Where to Grow:

Danger:

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Lake In The Hills, Illinois

Clinton Township, Michigan

Kure Beach, North Carolina

Gardeners' Notes:

On Jun 2, 2013, Cville_Gardener from Clarksville, TN (Zone 6b) wrote:

I love this plant. It has been fairly slow to spread. It was planted four years ago and is blooming for the first time this year with two bloom spikes to date. This is a non-blooming variety but apparently does bloom occasionally. The fuzzy gray foliage is very attractive. It dies down in the winter here and isn't terribly attractive then, but neither are a lot of plants. Great drought tolerance and nice as a ground cover.

On Sep 24, 2009, grrrlgeek from Grayslake, IL (Zone 5a) wrote:

There seems to be some confusion about the different cultivars of Lamb's ear. This is one of the non-blooming, sterile cultivars that does not reseed or attract bees, etc there are several available. Seems happy where I have it and hopefully will spread to fill in as a ground cover there.

On Apr 18, 2006, smlechten from Strongsville, OH (Zone 5b) wrote:

I've found this plant very invasive (NE OH). It is planted in a bed that receives full sun. It has covered the bed, choked my blue start junipers to death, spread into the lawn. Even if I shovel it out and cart it away it grows anywhere a small piece is dropped and left. It needs to be well maintained to keep it where you want it (unless you want it everywhere). If you are looking for a fast spread plant, this is a good one. Also, Cleveland gets a lot of rainy weather and they don't look great during a wet spring or fall, they can get very mushy and nasty looking when they aren't dry. The only way to get rid of them is with round-up or vegetation killer. I've dug out the bed twice and they are still prolific. They refill the bed within the same season!

On Mar 2, 2005, thurbersmom from Springfield, MO wrote:

I actually have a different variety since Silver Carpet is the one that does not bloom. Mine blooms in purple spikes. Bees love it. It grows here in Missouri very well. Only problem I have had is that it spreads steadily. My two small plants spread to a bigger patch than I wanted, over about three years. I have to go out with a shovel and dig some of it up every now and then when it spreads onto the lawn--a good way to get some to plant in other areas. Mine grows wonderfully in full sun I've heard from others in this area that they had it in shade and it never grew very well. Never needs extra watering, just rain pretty much a no-brainer plant. Stays fairly green over the winter.

On Jan 7, 2005, Mike_Lucas from Melbourne,
Australia wrote:

Has very small purple/blue flowers on spikes up to six inches long in spring. Is excellent for attracting honey bees to your garden. Cut back after flowering and it will send up new growth quite quickly.

On Jul 23, 2004, summerand3 from Bridgeview, IL wrote:


Identifying California Lizards

This is not a scientific key to identifying lizards found in California. It is meant to be used as a basic tool for the novice who wants to identify a lizard primarily by appearance and the location in California where it was seen.

(based on email sent to me asking me to help identify them.) There is a very good chance you'll find your lizard here, and you can skip the rest of this section.

In order to help you to identify a California native lizard, the different species have been separated into some basic groups. Since many lizards look similar, they are grouped by type, rather than appearance. Look at the thumbnails (click on them to see a larger version) and read the brief descriptions until you find something similar to the lizard you are trying to identify, then click on the link.

Keep in mind that many species look alike, and that there are other factors that can help you identify a lizard besides appearance, such as geographical location, behavior, and habitat. Juveniles often do not look exactly like adults. If you are trying to identify a juvenile, look at the body shape, and try to find a picture of an adult with a similar appearance, not necessarily the same colors or patterns.

Also keep in mind that any kind of lizard can vary in appearance and can look much different in motion than it does in a still photo. Sunlight and shade can also change the apparent color of a lizard, and lizards will change in color depending on their temperature.

Be aware that a lizard you find may not be native, but an introduced animal, such as an escaped pet, especially if it is found in or near an inhabited area. Currently there are few reproducing populations of introduced lizards in California, but that can change, and some of these populations, such as the Mediterranean gecko, are spreading.

You might also want to check the California Lizards Range Maps page to find what lizards occur in the area where your lizard was observed.

There is also a California Lizards Photo Index page with one picture of all forms of lizard found in the state that might also be helpful.

The only dangerously venomous native lizard found in California is the Gila Monster, which is extremeley rare and has only been found in a few locations in the eastern Mojave Desert. If you find one - send me pictures!

If you cannot find a lizard here, you can also look at our page of Escaped Pets which lists some common pet herps which have been reported to me.

Large smooth scales, and a long alligator-like snout. Found almost anywhere except in the deserts, mosty during daylight.
Frequently found underneath debris. Commonly found in suburban yards, especially in Southern California.

If the lizard you want to identify resembles one of the lizards shown below, go here to continue your search.

Small, diurnal lizards with large spiny scales. Western fence lizards (also known as swifts or bluebellies) are very
common, found in a variety of habitats. Sagebrush lizards have slightly smaller scales and are generally found at higher elevations.

If the lizard you want to identify resembles one of the lizards shown below, go here to continue your search.

Smooth, shiny skin, snake-like movement. Can be solid color or striped. Juveniles can have stripes and blue or pink tails.
Generally fond of moist habitats. During daylight, most often found underneath rocks and other debris.

If the lizard you want to identify resembles one of the lizards shown below, go here to continue your search.

Legless lizards

Resemble small snakes. Rarely found crawling in the open, except at night.
Typically found under objects or leaves, often in gardens in Southern California. Not commonly seen.

If the lizard you want to identify resembles one of the lizards shown below, look at the range map below to find which species it is, then click on the species link for more information. (This is difficult now that there are several species.)

Large, diurnal, rock-dwelling desert lizards with large heads and a dark collar around the neck.
Usually seen sitting on top of desert rocks.

If the lizard you want to identify resembles one of the lizards shown below, go here to continue your search.

Diurnal, long-talied lizards of hot, dry, flat open spaces. Can be striped, or spotted, or both. Almost always in motion.

If the lizard you want to identify resembles one of the lizards shown below, go here to continue your search.

Introduced to Morro Bay and Laguna Beach, and possibly more a humid locations along the southern coast. Mostly seen on shrubs and trees, occasionally on the ground.

Active at night in deserts or semi-arid locations. Often seen on roads at night or underneath debris in daytime.

Very rarely encountered. Found only in a few rocky locations in the desert near the Baja California border.

Commonly seen running across desert roads at night.

If the lizard you want to identify resembles one of the lizards shown below, go here to continue your search.

Not commonly seen. Found on desert rocks at night in a limited area in the southern peninsular range.

Active in and around human dwellings, especially under lights at night. Introduced into the southern deserts and quickly spreading throughout southern California and the Central Valley and elsewhere.

Found in areas of the southern deserts with fine wind-blown sand, especially large dunes.
Will run under a bush or dive into the sand to escape.

If the lizard you want to identify resembles one of the lizards shown below, go here to continue your search.

Typically found on the ground in hot, flat, sandy desert locations, such as dry washes.
Often seen sitting on low rocks when the temperature is very high. Active in daytime.

Diurnal. Typically found on the ground in hot, flat, sandy desert locations, such as dry washes and dunes.
Occasionally seen basking on low rocks or other objects. Able to continue activity during extreme heat.

Large, diurnal lizards, preferring open desert or semi-arid habitats.

If the lizard you want to identify resembles one of the lizards shown below, go here to continue your search.

Extremely rare in California. Venomous. Found only in the extreme eastern Mojave Desert near the Nevada border.

Small, wide, flattened, with many spikes, and horns surrounding the head. Diurnal.
Typically found in open sandy areas in deserts, chaparral, grassland.

If the lizard you want to identify resembles one of the lizards shown below, go here to continue your search.

A medium-sized greenish lizard, found on large rocks in the peninsular range, from the Baja California Border to near Palm Springs. Usually found near creeks and oases. Diurnal.

A very large, conspicuous lizard, seen on large rocks in rock outcrops and boulder piles in the deserts. Active during the day.

Large lizards with large visible spiny scales. Found in desert and semi-arid habitats and in coastal southern California and the transverse ranges. Usually seen on rocks or trees. Diurnal.

If the lizard you want to identify resembles one of the lizards shown below, go here to continue your search.

Brush and Tree Lizards

Brush lizards are diurnal desert-dwellers. Tree lizards are only found near the Colorado
River in the extreme southeast. Typically found on trees, bushes, and rocks.

If the lizard you want to identify resembles one of the lizards shown below, go here to continue your search.

Small lizards inhabiting deserts, grassland, or other hot, dry open locations. Very commonly seen during daylight.
This lizard can be abundant where it occurs. Probably the most commonly seen lizard in the desert.

Active day and night in deserts, semi-arid, and mountainous habitats south of the Bay Area, and a few of the Channel Islands.
Common, but rarely observed. During the daytime they are typically found only underneath objects or in rock cracks.

If the lizard you want to identify resembles one of the lizards shown below, go here to continue your search.


Plants→Lamb's Ears→Lamb's Ears (Stachys byzantina 'Silver Carpet')

General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit: Herb/Forb
Life cycle:Perennial
Sun Requirements:Full Sun
Full Sun to Partial Shade
Plant Height :4 to 6 inches (10-15cm)
Plant Spread :9 to 18 inches (20-45cm)
Leaves:Unusual foliage color
Other: Soft to the touch.
Flowers:Showy
Flower Color:Purple
Bloom Size:2"-3"
Flower Time:Summer
Late summer or early fall
Suitable Locations:Xeriscapic
Uses:Groundcover
Resistances:Rabbit Resistant
Humidity tolerant
Propagation: Seeds:Provide light
Needs specific temperature: 70F
Days to germinate: 21-35
Depth to plant seed: Surface sow.
Start indoors
Can handle transplanting
Other info: Sow late winter, 8-10 weeks before last frost. Transplant in the Spring. Pinch back when transplanting. Space 16" apart. Self seeds & spreads by roots.
Propagation: Other methods:Division
Stolons and runners

One of my favorite foliage plants is the 'Silver Carpet' variety of Lamb's Ears (Stachys byzantina). It's tough and semi-drought-tolerant.

This plant does not often flower and reseed. It is not a rampant grower and does not get out of control in our location.

This nonblooming cultivar has attractive, silvery green leaves that are soft and velvety to the touch. Grows best in full sun in organically rich soil. Sends out runners and spreads in optimum growing conditions. Last summer, it took over half of the bed it was in! Foliage provides interesting texture and color contrast. This cultivar remains quite short and works as a groundcover.

I've also not had spreading issues. In our Texas heat, during the hottest/driest weather it can look awful. Give it a good soaking and it comes right back to life within 12 hours.


How to Grow Lamb's Ear

The Spruce / Adrienne Legault

Lamb's ear is a sun-loving perennial plant grown for the thick, fuzzy foliage that creates a soft-textured mat in the garden. The plants spread readily, making them effective ground covers for sunny areas if you do not mind them taking over. As drought-tolerant perennials, lamb's ear is also a good candidate for rock gardens.

Quickly forming low mats of leaves, these well-known plants are grown more for the texture and color of the leaves than for the flowers, although they do occasionally produce light purple flowers on tall spikes. The flower spikes reach 12 to 18 inches in height, but the rest of the plant stays much closer to the ground and has a spread of about 1 foot. The silvery foliage color is useful when experimenting with color theory in your landscape design.

Indigenous to parts of the Middle East, lamb's ear is considered an invasive plant in parts of North America. They spread both by self-seeding and through creeping stems that root wherever they make contact with the soil. If you wish to control them, deadheading will address the former, but not the latter, which you will have to control with some type of edging. The plants are also deer-resistant and rabbit-proof.

Lamb's ear is typically planted in the spring and is a fast grower. A few new plants or cuttings started early in the spring can fill a large area by fall.

Botanical Name Stachys byzantina
Common Name Lamb's ears
Plant Type Herbaceous perennial
Mature Size 12–18 inches tall, up to 12 inches wide
Sun Exposure Full sun to part shade
Soil Type Well-draining, evenly moist to dry soil
Soil pH 6.0–6.5 (slightly acidic)
Bloom Time Summer
Flower Color Light purple
Hardiness Zones 4–7 (USDA)
Native Area Middle East
Toxicity Non-toxic


Watch the video: Tape-less Ear Posting an easy example Part 1. Twelve Titans Cane Corso


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